The Proclamation of 1625 ordered that Irish political prisoners be transported overseas and sold as laborers to English planters, who were settling the islands of the West Indies, officially establishing a policy that was to continue for two centuries. In 1629 a large group of Irish men and women were sent to Guiana, and by 1632, Irish were the main slaves sold to Antigua and Montserrat in the West Indies. By 1637 a census showed that 69% of the total population of Montserrat were Irish slaves, which records show was a cause of concern to the English planters. But there were not enough political prisoners to supply the demand, so every petty infraction carried a sentence of transporting, and slaver gangs combed the country sides to kidnap enough people to fill out their quotas. Although African Negroes were better suited to work in the semi-tropical climates of the Caribbean, they had to be purchased, while the Irish were free for the catching, so to speak. It is not surprising that Ireland became the biggest source of livestock for the English slave trade.

Who am I? Am I a human in the eyes of the world?

Theweepingprophet@africamybeloved

I have had this blog for sometime now, but I have not published anything until today. One of the reasons I had not published anything it is because I did not know where to begin. There are so many things I would like to talk about, I have so many issues with the world as it is, with myself, but most importantly I have issues with God. Do not get me wrong  I am a believer, and I believe in God. However, I have issues with God or perhaps let me say questions that I would love God to answer. As an African and a Christian we refer to God as both a mother and a father, therefore I believe I have a right to ask questions when I do not understand. And when I am not clear on something, especially when it is an issue that affect me directly, as a human being.  The questions I have…

View original post 1,602 more words

“God judges us according to our true essence, which [God] keeps whole and safe, inside God always. Divine judgment reflects our Beloved’s righteousness. But human judgment reflects our changeable fleshliness. . . . I could not find blame and anger anywhere in God!”Julian of Norwich